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10 years later, photographer remembers 9/11

Book of photographs documents memorials each year at Ground Zero

Marie Triller, a photographer from Albany, shot pictures at Ground Zero for 10 years. Those images are now a book, "10 Years: Remembering 9/11."

Marie Triller, a photographer from Albany, shot pictures at Ground Zero for 10 years. Those images are now a book, "10 Years: Remembering 9/11." Submitted photo

Right time, right place

Though her immediate documentation of 9/11’s devastation won’t show up in the book, she hasn’t kept those images hidden away. Right after the attacks, impromptu art exhibits popped up on the streets of New York City and Triller’s photos made the cut.

“They took some storefronts in SoHo and let anybody and everybody submit their photographs; some from professional photographers who were on the scene to amateurs,” said Triller. “They just hung them there, no frames like a gallery, just on a string from ceiling to ceiling and down the walls. They filled the rooms with images.”

When she visited the exhibits, Triller said the public response was inexplicable and she knew that’s where those particular photos belonged.

“People lined up for blocks outside waiting for a turn to go in and I was so moved by that and the fact that seeing these images meant so much to people; that the photos were so powerful,” said Triller.

So many questions, trying to provide answers

Those spontaneous art shows are what inspired Triller to share her photos and she started sending them across the country to satisfy the curiosity of people in California, Wyoming and Colorado, who were physically far removed from the tragedy.

“When I did send the work out I didn’t frame it or matte it or anything. It’s just about getting the images out and letting people see them and respond to them as they will,” said Triller. “[It’s] people all over the country just being hungry for discussion about 9/11.”

The questions and curiosity also encouraged Triller to get behind the lens, year after year, no matter how difficult the process.

“9/11 itself was history and it was over yet at the same time when I’d go to an anniversary each year, it wasn’t over, it was there,” said Triller. “There’s this living memorial that goes on every year and it was important to me and historic and I wanted to capture it and continue to capture it.”

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