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A House divided

Public support was part of original Loudon House approval, but where was it coming from?

The former Eamonn's Loudon House was an Irish bar that was demolished by BCI construction in 2008 to make way for luxury condominiums. Construction came to a halt after the downturn of the economy but the project has made its way back into the public a developer Mike Benson said he plans to finish the job.

The former Eamonn's Loudon House was an Irish bar that was demolished by BCI construction in 2008 to make way for luxury condominiums. Construction came to a halt after the downturn of the economy but the project has made its way back into the public a developer Mike Benson said he plans to finish the job.

— Mahan said she has no doubt that the associations notified their members about the meetings and the Loudon House project. She accused the previous administration of failing to communicate the issues.

“Most of the issues are really cleaning up the issues that were there before we got here,” she said. “For example, we were left with the situation of the rezoning in the western end of town. The same thing happened there. … Once again, the neighbors that live directly near there … seems like they were not included in all of this.”

The current Land Use Law only requires the town to circulate meeting notification placards to residents living within 200 feet of the property line of a proposed project. Mahan said the town has been constantly making amendments to the local law but has not changed that particular provision.

Brizzell, a current member of the board of directors for the Greater Loudonville Association, said the association has yet to take a stance on the project, but she said she is personally in favor of it. She said she lives a couple of miles from the site and understands the frustrations of the residents about having to look at just the elevator shafts, but she said the developers deserve a chance. She did, however, say the developer should be making a point to meet with the residents.

“It would behoove the developer to try and get people leading the charge against them to see if they can have some kind of voice in it,” she said.

Getting involved

Brizzell does believe, however, that not everyone will be notified about the meetings because the very logistics of reaching everyone can be difficult, and it takes some initiative for residents to keep themselves informed.

“There are placards placed on the property to notify neighbors,” she said. “They might have to get out of their car and walk down the road.”

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