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Loudon House to be condos after all

Developer BCI abandons switch to apartments after public comments, Planning Board decision

The former Eamonn's Loudon House was an Irish bar that was demolished by BCI construction in 2008 to make way for luxury condominiums. Construction came to a halt after the downturn of the economy but the project has made its way back into the public a developer Mike Benson said he plans to finish the job.

The former Eamonn's Loudon House was an Irish bar that was demolished by BCI construction in 2008 to make way for luxury condominiums. Construction came to a halt after the downturn of the economy but the project has made its way back into the public a developer Mike Benson said he plans to finish the job.

— Albany County Legislator Phillip Steck, D-Loudonville, also gave his opposition to the project through a letter to the Planning Board. He said while he was the Democratic chairman in the Town of Colonie he was hoping the government would be more responsive to the public and that the Planning Board essentially listened to the public outcry at the hearing.

He said the original proposal of luxury condominiums in that specific community was a bad idea, but since it was given final site approval in 2008 there is nothing that can be done.

“The Planning Board needs to listen to residents before any new concepts for the project can be approved,” he said. “I don’t think the residents want to see nothing there but the residents’ ideas must be listened to for what would be a more appropriate project.”

Denise Sheehan, a Republican who is currently running for supervisor in the Town of Colonie, was director of the Planning and Economic Development Department at the time the project came in front of the board. She said she believes the reason why the original plan was approved was because the neighborhood association and the Homeowners Association at Loudonville East showed their support for the project. The reason why was because the amount of effort the original developer, David Hayes, had put into informing the public and holding informal meetings with residents in the area.

“The neighbors had been involved in the project from the beginning,” she said. The neighbors had a very strong stake in that project… Talk and have dialogue instead of a public hearing where everyone bangs a drum. A lot get done through informal dialogue. You can talk in an open and honest way. That’s what I would do.”

This is where Benson said things are going to change.

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