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Receiver of Taxes elected no more, after 2013

Glenville voters significantly approve switch to appointed post

Glenville resident David Hennel casts his vote during the special election held at Glenville Town Hall on Monday, April 16. Voters approved changing the receiver of taxes from an elected to part-time position by 210-75, according to unofficial results.

Glenville resident David Hennel casts his vote during the special election held at Glenville Town Hall on Monday, April 16. Voters approved changing the receiver of taxes from an elected to part-time position by 210-75, according to unofficial results. Photo by John Purcell.

— Gary Kilinski, a Ridge Road resident, voted in support of the referendum and said Menhinick did a “great job” in the position, but he didn’t see the need for it to be an elected office.

The town’s 2012 Strategic Plan included restructuring the receiver of taxes position through outsourcing collections to a bank and merging the Town Clerk’s Office with the receiver’s department through a part-time appointed receiver.

Keotzle and his fellow board members have touted the change as a way to reduce costs and enhance services for residents. Some of the perks of using a bank would include Saturday hours, drive-thru service, online bill payment and more locations.

This year, the town has contracted with First National Bank of Scotia for tax collection services during for the June water collection and September school tax collection at a cost of about $7,000, Koetzle said. The town will negotiate a contract with First National for next year after both sides evaluate costs.

The town has so far saved around $100,000 through reorganization of the receiver’s department and clerk’s office, which included not hiring a deputy clerk. Koetzle said next year the town should save around $30,000 by contracting with a bank for collections and making the receiver position part time.

“Once they looked at the fact that we are saving significant money, we are enhancing services, then I think it was fairly easy for them to get behind it,” Koetzle said.

Resident Patricia Renna said she voted “yes” primarily because of the potential savings.

“It doesn’t need to be a full-time job and hopefully it will save money,” Renna said.

Former Rotterdam comptroller Patrick Aragosa, a Glenville resident, was hired by the town to fill the vacancy as the town’s busiest tax collection period started in January.

“(Aragosa) is doing the same thing without having benefits, collecting a pension and being full-time,” Kilinski said. “It is just the convenience of it, too.”

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