Quantcast

A walk in Wolf Hollow

Preservationists make push to turn damaged road into historic walkway

A view from the top of Wolf Hollow Road earlier this summer, which is within the portion of the roadway closed off by the county after it was deemed unfit for vehicles.

A view from the top of Wolf Hollow Road earlier this summer, which is within the portion of the roadway closed off by the county after it was deemed unfit for vehicles. Photo by John Purcell.

— The county has done stabilization work and rebuilt parts of road before, but current repairs are unlikely. The road was washed out around six years ago, too. Since the road runs directly alongside a small creek the water has torn apart the roadway during heavy rains. The county requested funding from FEMA to repair the road, but it was denied.

Now, Leon is suggesting the roadway, which likely won’t be repaired for vehicle traffic, could be turned into a nature walk.

“That road through Wolf Hollow has also been designated as a potential route of the Long Path,” he said. “My hope and the conservancy’s hope is that it can remain gated … and most importantly that we find a little bit of space, either at the top or bottom, so there could be parking for around half a dozen cars, because it is a beautiful scenic walk.”

He said connecting people to the area’s history through smartphones, perhaps by posting QR codes to link people to additional information on their phone while they walk.

“In order to have people realize how important nature is to us … you have to get them out there and have something interesting for them to engage them in,” Leon said.

James Schaefer, a research professor of anthropology at Union College, also has family ties to Wolf Hollow.

Schaefer’s father, Vincent, befriended several local farmers and people with historic interests. He has several historical documents about the area through his father’s collections.

Leon said he has just started to work on a book about the area to document its history. He lives about three miles west of Wolf Hollow and bedrock across his property is from the fault that created the gorge.

“I feel very connected to this place,” Leon said. “It is sort of emblematic of the Mohawk Valley in a lot of ways.”

Anyone interested in information or donating to the Mohawk Hudson Land Conservancy’s efforts to protect the area can visit its website at mohawkhudson.org.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment