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Books go into OverDrive

Geoffrey Kirkpatrick, director of the Bethlehem Public Library shows off a Kindle reader available to library patrons. The electronic readers are pre-loaded with titles from the library’s collection. They are not able to download other e-book titles, however.

Geoffrey Kirkpatrick, director of the Bethlehem Public Library shows off a Kindle reader available to library patrons. The electronic readers are pre-loaded with titles from the library’s collection. They are not able to download other e-book titles, however. Photo by Julie Cushine-Rigg.

— “It can’t be damaged, it can’t be lost and it can’t be stolen,” Kirkpatrick added.

The library’s selection still doesn’t rival that of hard copybooks, but it’s ever growing. Not all publishers offer their titles to libraries for their collections, and of the ones that do, each has its own set of rules and costs of titles to libraries.

With traditional books, libraries typically pay less than retail for a copy, and are able to accept donated books. However, that is not the case with e-books. Benedetti said that libraries have to pay retail, and are not able to accept donated e-book titles.

“Some allow for up to 26 check outs, then we purchase (the title) again. All of them (publishers) are reacting individually,” she said.

For more on borrowing e-books, visit your local library or digitalcollection.uhls.org.

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