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Cutting for a cause

Master Barber Gregory Zorian, III of Gregory’s Barbershops of Clifton Park and Delmar, tending to longtime customer Tom Lynch.

Master Barber Gregory Zorian, III of Gregory’s Barbershops of Clifton Park and Delmar, tending to longtime customer Tom Lynch. Photo by Julie Cushine-Rigg.

— Men looking to lock their locks into summer position could help a good cause while getting their trim this weekend.

On Sunday, June 3, Gregory’s Barbershop at 5 Southside Drive in Clifton Park will hold a Cut-A-Thon from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. to raise money for The Scleroderma Foundation Tri-State, Inc. Chapter.

Twenty dollars will get you a haircut and help to provide research and resources for those suffering from the autoimmune disease scleroderma. If you don’t need a trim, or you’re female, you can still help out by stopping in and donating.

Wendy Franze is a barber at Gregory’s. She had the idea for a fundraiser after learning that her sister in law, Amy Franze was diagnosed with scleroderma, the often progressive disease affecting connective tissues of the body. Approximately 300,000 people across the U.S. are living with the disease, about the number who have multiple sclerosis.

The Scleroderma Foundation Tri-State, Inc. Chapter, located in Binghamton, is the leading non-profit supporter of scleroderma research and funds more than $1 million in new grants every year. The national foundation started about 30 years ago. The Tri-State Chapter raises awareness of the disease, raises funds for research and provides support services for those suffering from the disease in New York, New Jersey and Connecticut.

Gregory’s has been participating in various fundraisers, including Coaches versus Cancer, Wildwood Programs and Children’s Hospital at Albany Medical Center, for the past 40 years.

“The community has been very good to us … we give back whenever we can,” said master barber Gregory Zorian III, owner of Gregory’s. He added that he was glad to help Franze in the effort.

The cause of scleroderma is unknown, although it is thought to have either a “trigger event” or a “genetic component.” One of the largest demographics affected by the disease is women in their 30s through their 50s.

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