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BC’s summer camp experiment

Two-week program pitched for another year after profit made

The Summer Enrichment Camp at Bethlehem Central will most likely be extended for a second year after attendance was greater than expected.

The Summer Enrichment Camp at Bethlehem Central will most likely be extended for a second year after attendance was greater than expected. Photo by Marcy Velte.

— Teachers and nurses on hand were paid $35 an hour and three interns were utilized for free. Additional supplies cost around $1,000. About $26,000 was collected in fees and altogether, the camp turned a profit of about $8,300.

“We’re excited because we were hoping to break even on this project and we ended up with a profit,” said Warner. “At this point we are trying to think of something really good to do with this money.”

Jones and Warner are looking to run the program again because they felt the community enjoyed an additional offering in which their children received additional guidance from their teachers. They are hoping to get information out earlier this year to get a better count of what courses will be offered and get a better handle on money collection.

Some of the profits may potentially be used to set up a scholarship fund for students who cannot afford to attend camp, instead of asking parent-teachers associations for those funds. It was also recommended that since the administrative internships are over, whoever coordinates the program next year should be paid.

“It was fun, but a lot of work,” said Jones.

Warner said another option would be to extend the program to offer classes to students in the high school, since many parents felt their older children would benefit from the classes. She didn’t feel it was wise to open the courses to students in lower grades because help is limited.

“We didn’t really hear anything negative,” said Warner. “Even the kids who were skeptical coming in, seemed to have a good time.”

Middle School Principal Mike Klugman said the impact to the school was minor and the when the students were in their courses, one could hardly tell they were in the building. He said the program has the potential to expand by a factor of two or three.

District Superintendent Tom Douglas commended Jones and Warner on their work.

“I have to admit you always worry about someone being lost in the shuffle, but the way you did it everyone was involved and it actually brought parents into the building,” he said. “You did a very nice job.”

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