Quantcast

Speaker to bring Ghana’s issues to light

Alice Kyei-Anti has spent decades working in Africa

Ghanian Presbyterian leader Alice Kyei-Anti will visit the Capital District to help raise money for preventative health measures, such as purchasing bed nets to stop the spread of malaria in Africa.

Ghanian Presbyterian leader Alice Kyei-Anti will visit the Capital District to help raise money for preventative health measures, such as purchasing bed nets to stop the spread of malaria in Africa.

— “We live in a global village,” said Kyei-Anti. “Sometimes we develop in the world thinking everyone is wealthy, especially those in America. People should come and learn more about the social and economic issues faced in Africa. ... People need to see the other side of the coin.”

A majority of women in Ghana are still living in poverty, and Kyei-Anti said some of her talk will center on her work to end domestic violence, high rates of prostiution and childbirth mortality rates.

During each visit, Kyei-Anti seeks out new health care methods to brings back to her country.

A major interest to health care providers in Africa is more knowleged on senior issues. Kyei-Anti said in Ghana seniors are cared for by their families, but many rural and tribal communities do not know how to handle dementia.

“They think they are out of mind or being bewitched,” she said. “We need education to let people know it is normal, so the children don’t abandon their parents and give them the necessary love and support they need. Anything deemed not normal can be associated with witchcraft.”

The Presbyterian Church in Ghana is now working to hold educational and recreation programs for seniors and their caregivers.

Lois Wilson from Westminister Presbyterian in Albany said Kyei-Anti’s congregation put on a senior festival that they are now copying in Albany. They are continuing their partnership to work together on similar social justice issues.

“When Alice is here, we look at the issues facing the U.S. in new ways. When you talk about issues in Africa, you also see more clearly what is happening here,” she said.

Kyei-Anti said the first time she visited America was in 1981 when she came to Houston to give a sermon. She was shocked to see slums and people living on the street.

“I thought only in Africa there were people with no place to sleep. It goes to show that poor spans the globe and the gap between rich and poor is widening throughout the world. We are trying together to end that, but it will take time.”

Kyei-Anti will preach about her experiences in Africa on Sunday, Oct. 14, at 10 a.m., at Delmar Presbyterian Church. After the service, she will speak again at 11:15 about Ghana’s efforts to reach the United Nations’ Millennium Development goals.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment