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Sandy spares area

Local officials say storm proved to be good test of readiness

Volunteers move equipment from the stage at Freedom Park in Scotia on Saturday, Oct. 27, and make final preparations before Hurricane Sandy struck on Monday, Oct. 29.

Volunteers move equipment from the stage at Freedom Park in Scotia on Saturday, Oct. 27, and make final preparations before Hurricane Sandy struck on Monday, Oct. 29. Submitted photo by Bill Pytlovany

— “There were scattered outages everywhere, the wind was pretty consistent for a while,” Stella said.

Saratoga County saw the most number of outages, though by the end of Tuesday only a few dozen residences were still in the dark. The towns of Day, Edinburg and Providence experienced the majority of outages.

Paul Lent, director of Emergency Services for Saratoga County, said at the peak of the storm there were about 6,200 customers without power. Three or four roads were closed for an hour or two during Monday night as downed trees were cleared, he said.

After days of buildup and anticipation, Lent said Sandy proved to be “kind of yawner.”

“Frankly, we have seen thunderstorms cause more damage than what we have seen last night,” Lent said. “We consider ourselves very lucky and not disappointed.”

Saratoga Springs Mayor Scott Johnson agreed on Tuesday the storm was not severe.

“The city can breathe much easier today now that Hurricane Sandy has not delivered the much feared impact as forecasted in the days earlier,” Johnson said in a statement. “Fortunately, we have dodged a potentially large bullet and have come out of Hurricane Sandy in good fashion.”

In Albany County, some rural residents were still without power on Tuesday morning, with the towns of Berne and Knox having the most outages. By midday, most customers had power restored.

Mary Rozak, spokeswoman for the Albany County Executive’s Office, said the storm proved to be a “good dress rehearsal” for dealing with severe weather events.

Rozak said county reached out to seniors normally getting home delivered meals to make sure they had enough supplies — water, flashlights and canned food — on hand to weather a severe storm.

Schenectady County saw minimal power outages and withdrew its countywide state of emergency declaration before 8:30 p.m. on Monday. County spokesman Joe McQueen said the storm was a good test of the county’s emergency preparedness.

“There was really minimal damage,” McQueen said. “Better to be overprepared than underprepared, and it was a pretty good opportunity for us to check our systems and have good test.”

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