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110th Assembly hopefuls face off

LWV holds candidate forum for Dem and Indy primaries; GOP and Dem differences shown

Democrat and Independence primary candidates for the 110th Assembly District face off in a forum on Wednesday, Sept. 5.

Democrat and Independence primary candidates for the 110th Assembly District face off in a forum on Wednesday, Sept. 5. Photo by John McIntyre.

— “We are not even giving anyone a motivation at that rate to come out and work,” she said. “If someone offered me that I would stay home, too.”

All of the candidates opposed voting for a pay raise for members of the state Assembly.

Pulse of healthcare

Candidates were also gauged for their support of creating a single-payer healthcare system on a state level.

Steck said he has continuously supported a single-payer system and said he would like to see the state take over Medicaid, so it would be pressured to solve cost issues around it.

“Single-payer … eliminates the tremendously high administrative cost,” Steck said.

Steck said in the single-payer system of Medicare holds an administrative expense at about 3 percent of the overall cost, while Medicaid falls around 40 percent.

Frazier said anyone not being able to access healthcare is shameful.

“I believe that health care in the Untied States is a fundamental right and everyone should have it,” Frazier.

Nichols said the best approach to a single-payer system would be on a national level, but he supports looking into it at the state level.

Landry took a different stance from fellow Democrats and said there are many ways to improve access to healthcare instead of enacting a single-payer system in the state.

“What we are seeing is a lot of employers that cannot provide health care because it is getting so expensive and they are trying to push it off onto the employees,” Landry said. “The single-payer healthcare system overlooks a lot of the problems that we have and a lot of the costs.”

Whalen strongly opposed a single-payer system and said it would be the wrong direction for the state and country.

“The single payer system would basically be like government rationing,” Whalen said. “There are not enough doctors available under a single payer health care system, because they are paid less and they just aren’t going to work as hard on fixed salary … of $100,000 a year.”

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