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Presentation outlines Glenville’s budget woes

Supervisor details initial outlook on next year’s fiscal plan

Glenville Supervisor Christopher Koetzle said revenues aren’t keeping pace with expenses during his initial 2013 budget presentation on Wednesday, Sept. 19.

Glenville Supervisor Christopher Koetzle said revenues aren’t keeping pace with expenses during his initial 2013 budget presentation on Wednesday, Sept. 19. Photo by John Purcell.

— Revenues are not keeping pace with expenses in Glenville, and residents will again bear the majority of the disparity through a tax hike, albeit one below the state tax cap.

That is what is proposed in Town Supervisor Christopher Koetzle’s preliminary 2013 budget presentation, which he made Wednesday, Sept. 19. He is slated to release his proposed budget Oct. 1.

Koetzle is planning to pitch a tax hike within the tax cap, which would allow for about a $100,000 increase in the property tax levy. He also has not wavered from a pledge to wean off fund balance usage, with next year’s budget using $165,000 less than this year, for a total of $650,000.

The tax burden on Glenville residents continues to be greater than that of surrounding municipalities, with residents supplying around 80 percent of property taxes, commercial 15 percent and the remaining 5 percent coming from other sources, according to Koetzle. Comparatively, Rotterdam and Niskayuna residents bear only around 60 percent of the tax burden. Clifton Park residents bear even less at 50 percent.

“We don’t have the commercial base like they have in Rotterdam, Niskayuna and Clifton Park,” Koetzle said. “This is why this board has been so focused on trying to build a commercial corridor, so that we can start shifting that burden on our residents on to the commercial entities.”

Revenues are projected to be flat despite recent economic development projects, such as Target, Lowes and Mohawk Honda, because of payment in lieu of taxes (PILOT) agreements negotiated between developers and the Schenectady County Industrial Development Agency, according to Koetzle.

“It is our money that is being given away, but we don’t have the ability to impact that giveaway,” Koetzle said.

Glenville PILOT properties total an assessed value of around $83 million, according to Koetzle. If those sites were taxed at full value, property tax revenue would total around $275,000 instead of the current $114,000, he said.

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