Quantcast

Test scores tumble after Common Core implementation

Around 70 percent of students are below the grade, new baseline established

Bethlehem Central School District nearly had 50 percent of students meeting or exceeding proficiency in both ELA and math tests across all grades, with its lowest score being eighth-grade math, with around 60 percent of students not meeting proficiency.

Guilderland Central School District typically had a range of students meeting or exceeding standards on both tests across all grades from around 45 percent to 52 percent.

South Colonie Central School District’s best performance overall was in fourth-grade math with 43.5 percent of students meeting or exceeding standards, and its lowest overall score was in fifth-grade math with almost 79 percent of students falling below proficiency.

North Colonie Central School District’s best score overall was in eighth-grade ELA with 57 percent of students meeting or exceeding standards, and its lowest overall score was in fourth-grade ELA with nearly 65 percent of students falling below proficiency.

Voorheesville Central School District only had two overall test scores falling below 49 percent of students meeting or exceeding proficiency standards, which was 33.7 percent of seventh-grade math and 39 percent of eighth-grade math scores. The district’s highest score was in third-grade math with nearly 74 percent of students meeting or exceeding standards.

Voorheesville Superintendent Teresa Thayer Snyder said test scores were typically 30 to 40 percent lower for each student.

“These tests were intentionally designed to obtain precisely the outcomes that were rendered,” Snyder said in a statement. “The rationale behind this is to demonstrate that our most successful students are not so much and our least successful students are dreadful.”

Snyder said “it does not mean much” even if a student scored at Level 4 last year, but dropped this year to Level 2.

“The tragic part of this story is the collateral damage — the little children who worked so hard this year, who endured so many distressing hours of testing, who failed to reach proficiency, all because of the manipulation of the scaling,” she said in a statement.

Robert Reidy Jr., executive director of the state Council of School Superintendents, claimed superintendents statewide “overwhelmingly” support the new standards.

“The Common Core standards represent an unprecedented shift in our expectations for schools and the students they teach. Students who meet these new expectations will be better prepared for the demands of the world they will inherit,” Reidy said in a statement. “With more time and resources, our schools will refine their practices and enable more and more students to reach the standards and surpass them.”

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment