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Meyers makes pro grade

Delmar native is one of two BCHS grads playing for Whitecaps

Robin Meyers is one of two Bethlehem Central High School graduates playing for the Boston Whitecaps in Major League Ultimate’s inaugural season. Meyers is a defender for the unbeaten Whitecaps.

Robin Meyers is one of two Bethlehem Central High School graduates playing for the Boston Whitecaps in Major League Ultimate’s inaugural season. Meyers is a defender for the unbeaten Whitecaps.

Robin Meyers is on the cutting edge of professional sports.

The Delmar native – along with fellow Bethlehem Central High School graduate Seth Reinhardt – is part of the Boston Whitecaps, one of eight ultimate frisbee teams playing in Major League Ultimate’s inaugural season.

That’s right. Frisbee has become a professional sport.

“The organizers felt that the time has come for ultimate frisbee because it has grown so much,” said Meyers.

Meyers and Reinhardt are both defenders for the Whitecaps, who won the Eastern Conference regular season title with a 10-0 record. But, Meyers said his position title doesn’t mean he has to remain a defender.

“What I find attractive about the sport is that everyone is responsible for playing offense and defense,” said Meyers, who has scored five goals and dished out eight assists while also forcing three throwaways and three drops. “As soon as you force a turnover, you’re on offense.”

Meyers’ love of ultimate frisbee began after graduating from BCHS in 2006. He joined the Dartmouth club as a freshman, and he hasn’t stopped playing since.

“It’s been pretty much a year-round activity for me,” said Meyers.

Once he graduated from Dartmouth, Meyers moved to Boston and joined the Boston Ironsides, one of the top amateur ultimate clubs in the country. Then when the Whitecaps came along, he jumped at the chance to play for them.

“It’s a major commitment for me outside of my job, but the return on investment is great,” said Meyers. “Between the two of them, it comes out to about 10 hours a week of (team-sponsored) practice time. We also have weightlifting sessions and running on a track. And, you’re also expected to do some training on your own. So between what I do with the teams and on my own, I probably spend about 20 hours a week practicing.”

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