Quantcast

Wolf Hill Road Bridge bids opened

Low bid totals $315k to replace Irene damaged bridge, project FEMA and state funded

Dave Hansen, a consultant hired by the town, opens a bid for the Wolf Hill Road Bridge replacement project on Thursday, June 27, as Town Clerk Diane Deschenes waits to record the bid information.

Dave Hansen, a consultant hired by the town, opens a bid for the Wolf Hill Road Bridge replacement project on Thursday, June 27, as Town Clerk Diane Deschenes waits to record the bid information. Photo by John Purcell.

— Two bids were received to replace the Wolf Hill Road Bridge in New Scotland, which suffered significant structural damage during Tropical Storm Irene. Unless the low bid is disqualified, the project will total nearly $315,000.

New Scotland called for bids to replace the bridge and only received two bids by the 3 p.m. deadline on Thursday, June 27. Around five people purchased bid packets and attended a mandatory meeting regarding the project, according to town officials. The low bid was below the town’s estimates for the project, though.

The low bidder was Stephen Miller General Contractors, Inc., and their offer was around $70,000 less than a bid from James H. Maloy, Inc.

Town Supervisor Tom Dolin said project was delayed because of dealing with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which administers federal funding for the project and had to OK plans.

“(The bridge) was hit by trees that had washed down the stream … and the streambed was eroded,” Dolin said.

The town sought to replace the damaged one-lane bridge with a two-lane bridge, but FEMA originally denied the proposal and wanted to replace it as a single-lane bridge, according to Dolin. Eventually, the town was able to get FEMA’s approval for the more modern two-lane design.

Dolin said the town had safety concerns connected to keeping it a one-lane bridge. The new bridge will also have a higher weight capacity than the older bridge.

“The old bridge couldn’t handle high-tonnage vehicles,” Dolin said.

The new bridge will also not have a center support, so it would be more resistant to the kinds of circumstances that brought about the structural damage it received from debris flowing down the stream during Irene.

Dolin said the most impact aspect of replacing the bridge is it would reduce the response time for first responders to surrounding residences by about 10 to 12 minutes.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment