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Shedding light on domestic violence

Albany County highlights Domestic Violence Awareness Month, services offered

Albany County Executive Dan McCoy presents a proclamation to county Crime Victim and Sexual Violence Center Director Karen Ziegler on Wednesday, Oct. 2, during a kick off press conference for Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Albany County Executive Dan McCoy presents a proclamation to county Crime Victim and Sexual Violence Center Director Karen Ziegler on Wednesday, Oct. 2, during a kick off press conference for Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Photo by John Purcell.

— “We can never have the impact that we want to have if we don’t have the help of the community,” Rossi said. “Domestic violence is not a private problem that only affects those behind closed doors. Domestic violence is a cancer to a community. It starts with the perpetrator, it spreads to the victim, to the children, to the neighborhoods, to the schools, to the family and to the entire community.”

In 1974, the center began as Albany Women Against Rape, or AWARE, and the following year the agency became a county department. The original intent was to provide crisis counseling to rape victims through a 24-hour hotline, along with advocacy and support. The department did community outreach to publicize the frequency of rape and its effects.

The agency grew over the years and in 1989 received a grant from the state Crime Victims Board to provide advocacy services for violent crime victims throughout the county. The agency merged its victim assistance program and rape crisis center in 2001, forming the current department.

“I cannot say enough about the staff here at Albany County and the dedication that they have,” McCoy said. “They don’t do it for the pay check. They do it because they believe in what they are doing. … That means a lot when they are either answering a phone or dealing with a victim to have someone that really has that compassion and care.”

McCoy said Ziegler has stressed the importance of her department to him as budgets are crafted to ensure services remain unchanged.

“You do inspire me with what you do in that office,” McCoy said to Ziegler.

Ziegler said the work done by the department requires support from the county and strong partnerships.

Ziegler announced the county will be launching a new initiative in December, “Be the Difference,” which aims to train one staff member from each of the county’s larger departments about effectively addressing domestic violence.

McCoy said he hopes the county will be able to impart lasting change, “so the next generation doesn’t think it is okay to sexually assault someone … or (be) violent towards other people.”

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