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Harmony reached over historic barn

Developers appear agreeable to allowing time for LeVie Barn relocation

Daniel Hershberg, representing Country Club Partners, presented a site plan for an 18-lot residential subdivision, which would be known as Country Club Estates, at the New Scotland Planning Board meeting Tuesday, Feb. 4.

Daniel Hershberg, representing Country Club Partners, presented a site plan for an 18-lot residential subdivision, which would be known as Country Club Estates, at the New Scotland Planning Board meeting Tuesday, Feb. 4. Photo by John Purcell.

— What will happen to the LeVie barn remains unclear, with property owners seeking approvals for a residential development, but local officials are likely to have an extended timeframe to relocate the historic structure.

The New Scotland Planning Board on Tuesday, Feb. 4, returned to Country Club Partners’ application seeking an 18-lot residential subdivision for a 22.4-acre property, which holds the 115-year-old barn town officials are trying to relocate locally. Town Board member Daniel Mackay previously expressed frustration over how long it took to be granted access to the building and worried if there would be enough time to relocate the historic barn. Daniel Hershberg, representing the property owners, was receptive to stalling a portion of development to allow more time for relocation efforts.

The barn is located on lot 18 alongside Route 85A, so development could proceed as planned for the other 17 lots, with the roadway constructed up to the barn. Hershberg said the barn and adjacent parking area could be left alone “until the tail end of site development.” The Colonie Country Club has used the barn as a maintenance storage facility.

“The town has a very strong interest in seeing the barn preserved … not see it demolished for scrap and seeing it put to a higher use,” Planning Board Chairman Charles Voss said. “It is unrealistic to pick the structure up … but to certainly dismantle it and reassemble it somewhere would be an option.”

Fellow board member Kurt Anderson, who visited the barn with Mackay in December, said the structure was in “very good condition,” with some holes in the roof. He added dismantling the structure could be done “fairly quickly,” and it could be reused for many purposes.

“It was an extraordinary structure to be within,” Mackay said. “I would have to say, even though I work in the field of historic preservation and have seen a number of extraordinary sites in New York state, this is one of the most awe-inspiring buildings I have been in.”

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