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Opinionated art

Colonie Central students learn how to craft political cartoons

Students at South Colonie Central High School in Lisa Benanto's Studio in Cartooning Animation class work on an assignment Tuesday, Feb. 11.

Students at South Colonie Central High School in Lisa Benanto's Studio in Cartooning Animation class work on an assignment Tuesday, Feb. 11. Photo by Billy DeLap.

When high school students are tasked with creating political cartoons, the topics they choose to combine range from budget cuts at their school to social issues.

Students in Lisa Benanto’s Studio in Cartooning Animation class at Colonie Central High School learned about political cartoons and were then asked to combine a political issue and something they are interested in to make a cartoon.

Benanto spent a day lecturing the students on political cartoons and two days on a packet going over the history of political cartoons so the students would have background information.

Benanto is preparing the students for a 100-question test they will be given at the end of the year to test their knowledge of the course. The test is a requirement of the Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR), which was created in 2012 to monitor the effectiveness of the teachers.

One topic that a few students picked dealt with the issue of budget cuts and losing an art program and a teacher. Many of the students participated in the after school art club that was cut.

“Last year we had an $8 million dollar deficit, I believe, so the kids lost a lot of teachers. So, it’s still fresh in their minds. It was their art club teacher,” said Benanto.

Many of the students said it was depressing that they didn’t have the art club anymore. The students met after school and got to hang out with their friends and create art.

One of the cartoons shows students displaying their award winning art when a man in a suit with large scissors comes and cuts their paintings in half. In a class discussion on the cartoons, the students said it made them feel like art didn’t matter or wasn’t important.

Bullying and discrimination were another popular topic. Brenda Freeman, a junior, made a cartoon with a woman in a burqa. The woman was picked on so much that she committed suicide, which is depicted in the final phase by the woman having her eyes covered.

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