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Voorheesville school board adopts budget

Property taxes would increase 2 percent; state aid boost restores cuts

Voorheesville Board of Education President Timothy Blow, right, and Superintendent Teresa Thayer Snyder listen to the public comments at the board’s Monday, April 8, 2013, meeting.

Voorheesville Board of Education President Timothy Blow, right, and Superintendent Teresa Thayer Snyder listen to the public comments at the board’s Monday, April 8, 2013, meeting. Photo by John Purcell.

— An infusion of state aid restored some of the most contentious cuts slated for Voorheesville school district’s 2014-15 budget, which stays within its state-mandated tax cap.

The Voorheesville Board of Education on Monday, April 21, unanimously adopted a spending plan totaling $22.89 million, which remained essentially unchanged from its March 31 meeting. The property tax levy is increasing 2.04 percent, or almost $328,000, which totals just under $16.44 million. An additional $144,000 of state aid was included in the state budget, with overall state aid totaling nearly $5.15 million.

Board of Education President Timothy Blow said he was “relieved” with the final budget.

“We were able to restore many things that we had never wanted to cut to begin with,” Blow said. “Not to mean that they are not potential cuts for next year. … Until something changes in this formula of out of control expenses … and fixed revenue it is not good for the school district.”

Even with the boost in state aid, Voorheesville is still receiving less than it did during the 2008-09 school year.

The district is holding a mandated budget hearing on Monday, May 12, at 7:30 p.m. in the Large Group Instruction (LGI) room at the middle school. The budget vote will be held on Tuesday, May 20, from 2 to 9 p.m. in the middle school foyer.

Restorations and reductions

The boost in state aid shrunk the district’s budget gap to around $175,000. This allowed the board to restore two of the most contentious cuts, which were the elimination of one section of the fourth grade next school year and the phasing out of French classes.

Some school board members expressed reservations over limiting foreign language options to only Spanish. Part of the push toward phasing out French is declining enrollment in the language.

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